Tuesday, July 18, 2017

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman


Lyra Belacqua is content to run wild among the scholars of Jodan College, with her daemon familiar always by her side. But the arrival of her fearsome uncle, Lord Asriel, draws her to the heart of a terrible struggle—a struggle born of Gobblers and stolen children, witch clans and armored bears. And as she hurtles toward danger in the cold far North, Lyra never suspects the shocking truth: she alone is destined to win, or to lose, this more-than-mortal battle.






* * *

Once upon a time there was a general assumption that adults read Adult books and only picked up Children’s books at bedtime to entertain their offspring. This all came to an end when a certain young wizard arrived on the shelves and adults got their very own edition so that they could read on the bus or the train without admitting that they were reading *gasp* Children’s Literature. Coupled with the rising popularity of the new YA genre, it has become increasingly acceptable for grown-up readers to openly admit that they enjoy books from the non-Adult part of the collection. Of course I am over-simplifying, but I know that Harry Potter was something of a gateway novel for me: having progressed to Adult books at a young age I had never before thought of returning to the Junior Library for my reading material. Authors like Philip Pullman have convinced me that the age of the intended audience is no indication of the excellence or seriousness of a piece of writing.

The Golden Compass (or Northern Lights, as it is called in the UK) begins in the labyrinthine halls of Jordan College, Oxford, as our orphaned heroine, Lyra, sneaks into the Master’s Retiring Room, which is forbidden for non-Scholars and all females. Although this all sounds ordinary enough, we are introduced to a world that is subtly different from our own. The technology has a steam-punk feel to it, opium poppies are widely used by the Scholars and the social structures are built around the Magisterium, a theocracy that strictly controls most areas of life. However, the most significant difference is that all the humans in this world exist in two distinct bodies: a person and their daemon.

A person’s daemon is an external embodiment of their inner being. They are almost always of the opposite gender to their human and share their person’s level of intelligence and ability to communicate. They can act independently and we certainly see Lyra arguing with her daemon, Pantalaimon, quite a lot as he tries to stop her taking risks. During childhood, a person’s daemon can change shape and size at will, so we see Pan in a variety of forms as the situation demands. Once puberty arrives this ability to change is lost as the daemon ‘settles’ into a final form which heavily reflects the inner character of the person. It is noted that servants usually have dog daemons because they are loyal and follow instructions, while more unique characters are accompanied by suitably magnificent, vicious or sneaky daemons. Given this duality, it can be tempting to treat the characters and their daemons in this universe as separate individuals; however, I will continue assuming that Lyra is the heroine of the story even though Pan is with her every step of the way.

The exact nature of daemons, and their link to humans, is something of a mystery to the people of this world but one that is fundamental to this particular story. Once she is trapped in the Retiring Room, Lyra witnesses a presentation on a strange substance called Dust, which can only be seen using special equipment. Dust falls continually from the sky but is attracted to adults whose daemons have ‘settled’ but not to pre-adolescent children. Later, we learn that the Magisterium believes that Dust is a manifestation of Original Sin and are seeking ways to protect children from it. In order to do this they are taking unaccompanied children from the streets, leading to whispers of the ‘Gobblers’ hunting the poor neighborhoods. When Lyra’s friend, Roger, disappears she believes that the Gobblers are responsible and sets off to rescue him. In doing so, she begins a journey that will lead her into the frozen wastes of the farthest North and into the company of water-roving Gyptians, tribes of ancient witches, an American balloonist and a drunken armored bear.

During her journey, Lyra displays a fierce courage and a stubborn determination to help her friend, with her actions creating ripples of consequence that change the entire world. She is revealed to have a Destiny that could affect the whole of creation, in this world and all the others, however, she is less than perfect. Her disregard for rules, personal hygiene and ethical behavior is a problem for those who try to raise her. She is particularly adept at deceit and can create the most spectacular lies when the need arises. Whilst this allows her to overcome some highly dangerous situations, it is hardly a character trait that you would want young readers to emulate. Fortunately, Pan is a much more cautious character and he usually counsels against her most reckless and impulsive behavior.

As a hero, Lyra displays a prodigious amount of good luck, but is otherwise fairly normal, making mistakes and suffering like any other person. The only super-human power that she displays is her uncanny ability to use the precious alethiometer, a compass-like device that the Master gives to her. It has a series of images around the edge that can be used to frame any possible question and provide a truthful answer, although it usually takes a lifetime to master the framing of questions and the interpretation of answers. Lyra has an instant understanding of how to use the alethiometer and uses it to make some crucial decisions during her journey although the source of her gift is unknown at the end of this first part of the His Dark Materials trilogy.

As a small and uninspiring physical specimen, Lyra relies on other characters to provide her with money, resources and muscle. Perhaps the most memorable of her comrades is the entirely alien panserbjorne, Iorek Byrnison. When we first meet Iorek he is an armored bear stripped of his armor and forced to do manual labor for a small town, resorting to alcoholism to deaden the pain of his humiliation. In return for finding his missing armor, Iorek agrees to accompany Lyra on her quest to rescue Roger and gradually becomes her staunchest ally. Whilst the idea of having a ‘tame’ armored polar bear is always going to be appealing, Iorek is a favorite character because he is so well-drawn and non-human. There is nothing remotely cuddly about him, even though he is very furry: shortly after he regains his armor he kills a seal so that he can use its blubber to lubricate the various pieces and remove the rust. Although Lyra introduces him to the concept of deception, he remains totally alien throughout the series in both his thought patterns and attitudes.

We encounter a second non-human society in the tribes of witches that agree to aid Lyra. Although appearing as young and fragile women, they live to be hundreds of years old and so have a detached attitude towards the humans who live such short lives in comparison. Although they often fall in love with human men and have children with them, this is a source of great pain because the men wither and grow old so quickly and any male children will inherit their father’s short life span. As with the panserbjorne, the witches view the world differently from us, able to ignore the intense cold even though they wear little clothing and flying on branches of Cloud-Pine. The otherness of these and other peoples in the series adds a rich depth to Pullman’s universe, making it feel real and fully realized.

As might be expected in a Children’s book, Lyra is an orphan and initially distrustful of most adults. However, she is taken in by the beauty and generosity of Mrs Coulter and is happy to be taken away from boring Oxford and introduced to the excitement of sophisticated London. Unfortunately, Mrs Coulter is not all she seems to be and her behavior becomes increasingly creepy and cruel when Lyra continues to be unruly. Her daemon is an unnamed golden monkey that reveals a much more violent and uncaring personality lurking beneath the beauty. It is later revealed that Mrs Coulter is actually Lyra’s mother, which makes some of her behavior even more unpalatable. Throughout the series she remains a fascinating character who probably shows the greatest development as her love for Lyra begins to overwhelm her ambitions and sense of self-preservation. In many ways she reminds me of Professor Snape in the Harry Potter universe: a character that we despise initially but whose motivations are slowly revealed to be less evil than they appear at first.

Whilst I love this series and would encourage anyone to read it, I need to add a warning about the controversial aspects of the world depicted. These are not heavily addressed in the first book, although we are told that the witches have a prophecy about Lyra and her destiny to be a second Eve. However, as the series progresses we see Lord Asriel creating an army to fight a rebellion against Heaven itself, which can be reached through a window between parallel universes. Philip Pullman is an atheist so his depiction of the Authority / God may be appalling to some, although he has many supporters within various denominations of Christianity. The series discusses ideas of free will and personal responsibility whilst railing against the dogma of oppressing people ‘for their own good’. This is most clearly seen in the experiments that the Gobblers are conducting on the stolen children: whilst their intentions are to prevent the children from being subject to the effects of Original Sin, their methods are barbaric and horrifying.

In summary, I would recommend this series if you want a jolly good read that will entertain you and also alter the way you think about the universe.
 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

A grumpy yet lovable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn't walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove's mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents' association to their very foundations.

* * *

Working at the front desk of a library gives me a good indication of what books are ‘hot’ and, of course, patrons share their views. When this title became a permanent fixture on our hold shelf I started to take notice of the feedback and eventually came to the conclusion that it might be a good choice for the group. I am pleased to report that it lived up to the hype, unlike some other titles that I could mention.

Once we had settled on how to pronounce Ove (Oooh-veh) most of the group waxed lyrical about how much they loved this book. We liked Ove, who was so grumpy that he was almost adorable: imagine an angry Droopy and you get the idea. Our first encounter shows Ove raging at a computer salesman. He is rude and condescending, assuming that the salesman is incompetent because the two men are unable to understand one another: Ove has no idea about computers and is angry to be asked questions that make no sense to him. Somehow his vitriol is witty enough, and close enough to things we have all wanted to say out loud, that the scene is funny and endearing. We automatically feel a kinship with this man raging against a world that has had the audacity to change around him.

The following scenes are shockingly dark and immediately reveal the terrible sadness of Ove’s life on the day after he is forced into retirement. The ongoing story of his unwilling interactions with his neighbors is interwoven with flashbacks that show us the important, character-forming, moments of his past. This is a clever way to slowly reveal who he is and why he has become the desperately lonely and angry man that we meet at the beginning. It also makes him grow more complex and sympathetic as we start to see the brave, honest and caring man behind the façade. Whilst most of us liked this structure it did fail some of the group who were too depressed by the darkest scenes at the beginning to continue to the lighter and more redemptive conclusion. 

Most of us recognized Ove from people we know. He comes from an era when men were defined by their jobs and skills, taking great pride in their ability to work hard and provide for their family. In Ove’s mind, a true ‘man’ can handle anything that is required of him and is self-sufficient in maintaining his house, car, garden, neighborhood and everything that entails. However, he does have one area of expected weakness: he shares that generation’s expectation of manly stoicism in the face of emotional upset and relies upon his wife to handle all their social interactions. This attitude is encapsulated in a wonderful scene that recalls his first meeting with his prospective father-in-law. The two men are incapable of socializing with each other until Ove offers to fix an old car: this proves his suitability as a potential spouse and wins the old man’s approval. They continue to communicate in grunts and gestures, but the bond of acknowledged competence is sufficient to keep the peace.

Whilst Ove consistently proves to be competent and dedicated, his life is a series of disasters. He suffers more than his fair share of bad luck and we finally come to understand that he has survived in spite of everything that the world has thrown at him. It is hardly surprising that he is bitter and paranoid: he has overcome loss and disaster again and again, building up a wall of indifference and spite to deal with life’s disappointments. A lifetime of experience has taught him to expect the worst of every person he meets and his unreasonableness is perfectly understandable once you see what he has lived through. He also carries a great deal of guilt and self-blame about some events that he thinks he might possibly have been able to alter if he had only acted in time. As is often true, he judges nobody more harshly than he judges himself.

Whilst the book contains a lot of humor it also deals with a wide range of very serious issues. Poor Ove has to endure many of them himself, although some afflict his family and neighbors. I do not want to discuss most of them because that will spoil the book for those who have not read it and lessen the emotional impact of certain revelations. One issue that is central to Ove’s hardships and salvation is that of the change to a more urbanized society. He sees the benefits of a simpler, more village-like, social structure where people are accountable to one another and work for the common good. In contrast, he is constantly frustrated by the faceless ‘men in white shirts’ in local government who refuse to bend rules or even make decisions because they have no personal investment in the outcome. He often resorts to breaking the rules in order to accomplish goals that seem obviously right to him and then is punished for his actions. This has left him bitter and disillusioned with the benefits of modern life.

This is a book that made me both laugh and cry, which is something of an accomplishment these days. I would recommend it for anyone who enjoys sniggering at someone having a good rant, but who also likes their reads to have depth and provoke serious thought about social issues.

  

Saturday, May 20, 2017

The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey



While an illness keeps her bedridden, Bailey watches a wild snail that has taken up residence on her nightstand. As a result, she discovers the solace and sense of wonder that this mysterious creature brings and comes to a greater understanding of her own confined place in the world.

Intrigued by the snail’s molluscan anatomy, cryptic defenses, clear decision making, hydraulic locomotion, and mysterious courtship activities, Bailey becomes an astute and amused observer, providing a candid and engaging look into the curious life of this underappreciated small animal. 





 * * *

One of our members suggested this title years ago when we were still sticking to works of Fiction. I have to admit that the title seemed a little strange and not very inviting so I rather forgot about it until I was actively looking for Non-Fiction titles to offer the group. At that point I read the blurb and thought that it could be an interesting read because we had just finished Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. Of course, Will’s disability is purely physical and permanent, with no hope of recovery, whilst Elisabeth has the agony of possible recovery and mental fatigue to overcome. She does so in the most intriguing way.

The author recounts her experiences of falling ill during a trip to Europe in only the vaguest terms, which helps to convey how ill she was feeling at the time. She describes flu-like symptoms and I was rather shocked to discover that she was allowed to travel whilst she was so obviously ill. Of course, this was in the days before Swine Flu, Avian Flu and all the other horrors that have zipped around the globe courtesy of air travel. Somehow she makes it home and then does not recover as expected. We join her when she has already been bed-ridden for some time and has been moved to Maine to be cared for and, hopefully, recover.

We learn very little about the time before the snail enters her life, and not much more detail of her day-to-day existence once it arrives. We are not presented with lists of prescriptions, practical details or daily obstacles to normal existence, such as how she goes to the bathroom. Instead, everything is focused on her observations of the snail, an unintended visitor from the woods outside her window. Due to her mental fatigue and oversensitivity to sensory input, the snail’s slow and quiet life fits in to her own pace of living. At first she merely observes its behavior, but then she begins to interact with it and use it as a focus for her daily life. She cares for the snail in ways that she can no longer care for herself and is fascinated by everything it does. She follows its meanderings around her room and tries to improve its environment by providing it with a suitable home and food, delighting in its apparent enjoyment of mushrooms.

As we follow the snail’s progress the author includes information about its anatomy, physiology and behavior, all learnt once she had recovered enough to sit up and read. If there is anything you ever wondered about snails, this is the book to answer your question in a direct and easily understood manner. Whilst Elisabeth does not shy away from using biological terminology, she communicates scientific information very clearly and in a way that shows her total delight at the wonders of such a tiny miracle of nature. She is clearly overjoyed by the complexity and beauty displayed by such a supposedly boring and insignificant animal and wants to share that wonder with everyone who reads the book.

I found this delightful because it resonates with my own feelings about the natural world. I have always loved to understand why things do what they do, so I trained as a scientist, but my choice of Biology as my main area of study is directly linked to the sense of wonder I feel when I observe the details of the world around me. Yes, I am that strange person who is actually happy to see a live skunk foraging on the side of the road as I drive home from work (and posts about it on Facebook!). I am also the person who went to Vancouver Aquarium twice in one holiday because they had a newborn Beluga whale. Perhaps it is no surprise that I used to teach high school Biology and I am married to a professional biologist who is obsessed with keeping reptiles.
  
I find nature both wondrous and relaxing, especially when I can get outside and experience it, so being trapped inside is a nightmare for me. I was once badly injured in a car accident and could only move with great difficulty, but I could at least get outside into our garden for brief excursions. I would hate to be trapped in my bed for a prolonged period as the author was. Her confinement was made crueler because she could not even read or listen to music to pass the time and escape her immediate environment. However, she does not whine or moan about her situation, even though there is no promise of recovery. I found this inspiring and was profoundly happy to discover that she did eventually become able to go outside and say goodbye to her tiny savior.


Edited to: add this image of the Japanese edition cover with its amazing 'snail' marks in the dust jacket.



Books for September

After some rather serious and literary reading the group requested something lighter for the summer. I did offer books some books by American authors, but the selections are all written by British authors, although only one of them is set in the UK itself. The Color of Magic is the first of Terry Pratchett’s immensely successful, and very silly, Discworld series, which reached a massive total of 41 novels and numerous novellas and companion books. Alexander McCall Smith is also a prolific writer, although he splits his titles between several series: his The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series is set in Botswana and introduces us to the delightful Mma Ramotswe. The Uncommon Reader is a quintessentially English novella by Alan Bennett, National Treasure and author of a wide variety works, including the plays, and screenplays, The Madness of King George and The History Boys.

All 3 titles are now available on the Nooks.



The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

In the beginning there was…a turtle.

Somewhere on the frontier between thought and reality exists the Discworld, a parallel time and place which might sound and smell very much like our own, but which looks completely different. Particularly as it’s carried though space on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown). It plays by different rules.

But then, some things are the same everywhere. The Disc’s very existence is about to be threatened by a strange new blight: the world’s first tourist, upon whose survival rests the peace and prosperity of the land. Unfortunately, the person charged with maintaining that survival in the face of robbers, mercenaries and, well, Death, is a spectacularly inept wizard…


The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith

Mma Ramotswe—with help from her loyal associate, Grace Makutsi—navigates her cases and her personal life with wisdom, good humor, and the occasional cup of tea.

This is the story of the delightfully cunning and enormously engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to “help people with problems in their lives.” Immediately upon setting up shop in a small storefront in Gaborone, she is hired to track down a missing husband, uncover a con man, and follow a wayward daughter. But the case that tugs at her heart, and lands her in danger, is a missing eleven-year-old boy, who may have been snatched by witchdoctors.



The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett

When her corgis stray into a mobile library parked near Buckingham Palace, the Queen feels duty-bound to borrow a book. Discovering the joy of reading widely (from J. R. Ackerley, Jean Genet, and Ivy Compton-Burnett to the classics) and intelligently, she finds that her view of the world changes dramatically. Abetted in her newfound obsession by Norman, a young man from the royal kitchens, the Queen comes to question the prescribed order of the world and loses patience with the routines of her role as monarch. Her new passion for reading initially alarms the palace staff and soon leads to surprising and very funny consequences for the country at large.




Thursday, April 27, 2017

Fall Meeting Dates

The next meeting, on May 18 will be last one before the library moves to summer hours. Here are the dates for the Fall:

September 14
October 12
November 9
December 7




Saturday, April 22, 2017

Books for May

After the horrors of the World War Two in Anthony Doerr’s stunning All The Light We Cannot See, the group asked for something ‘fluffier’. I am not sure if these two titles fulfill that criterion, but they are now available on the Nooks.


Behind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris

Everyone knows a couple like Jack and Grace: he has looks and wealth, she has charm and elegance. You'd like to get to know Grace better. But it's difficult, because you realize Jack and Grace are never apart. Some might call this true love.

Picture this: a dinner party at their perfect home, the conversation and wine flowing. They appear to be in their element while entertaining. And Grace's friends are eager to reciprocate with lunch the following week. Grace wants to go, but knows she never will. Her friends call—so why doesn't Grace ever answer the phone? And how can she cook such elaborate meals but remain so slim? And why are there bars on one of the bedroom windows?

The perfect marriage? Or the perfect lie?




My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout


Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn't spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy's childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lies the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy's life: her escape from her troubled family, her desire to become a writer, her marriage, her love for her two daughters.



Saturday, March 25, 2017

Books for April

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr


Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.


The Rithmatist by Brandon Sanderson


More than anything, Joel wants to be a Rithmatist. Rithmatists have the power to infuse life into two-dimensional figures known as Chalklings. Rithmatists are humanity’s only defense against the Wild Chalklings. Having nearly overrun the territory of Nebrask, the Wild Chalklings now threaten all of the American Isles.

As the son of a lowly chalkmaker at Armedius Academy, Joel can only watch as Rithmatist students learn the magical art that he would do anything to practice. Then students start disappearing—kidnapped from their rooms at night, leaving trails of blood. Assigned to help the professor who is investigating the crimes, Joel and his friend Melody find themselves on the trail of an unexpected discovery—one that will change Rithmatics—and their world—forever.




Saturday, March 11, 2017

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes




Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life - steady boyfriend, close family - who has never been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex-Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair-bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life - big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel - and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is.

Will is acerbic, moody, bossy - but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.




 * * *

Please Note: This review assumes that you have read the whole book and therefore reveals the Will’s final decision.

I was a little wary of this title even though it was very highly rated. Reading the blurb made me dread a sickly sweet Romance that ends with the good love of the Plucky Young Heroine convincing the poor, disabled Man Without Hope that life is indeed worth living. Fortunately that is most definitely not what we got, which is good because I was not looking forward to his electronic wheelchair humming off into a cozy sunset.

Our first impression of Will Traynor is not very flattering. He is rude, arrogant and totally self-absorbed. He is so important that he cannot wait and runs across the road to grab a taxi: right into the path of a motorcycle. This was an interesting choice by Ms Moyes, because it makes Will partially, if not wholly, responsible for his own fate. He is not a victim, even at the moment when his life is destroyed forever, and I was left wondering about the fate of the poor person on the motorbike, who could quite easily have been killed or terribly injured by the same accident.

Equally, Louisa is not the most inspiring of heroines. She floats through life trying to avoid anything difficult or challenging. Her job is easy and boring, her boyfriend is thoughtless and boring and her family life is cramped and unsupportive. To say that she is in a rut is a massive insult to ruts. She is stuck in a chasm of dull responsibility with no prospects of anything better coming along before she dies. But, all good things must come to an end so she is fired unexpectedly and her parents pressure her into applying for any job available. Of course, her lack of qualifications or interesting life experience make it difficult for her to get anything other than a soul-destroying job at the local chicken processing plant. As she comes to terms with this situation as her new future she gets an interview for a job as an assistant to a badly disabled man. For once, her unique approach to fashion and life is an asset and Mrs Traynor sees some possibility that Louisa will be able to reach Will and make him enjoy life a little.

At first glance, this seems massively improbable, especially as Lou has no training or expertise working with very disabled people. However, we soon learn that there is a trainee nurse to provide all the heavy lifting, medically speaking, and that Will has already dismissed all the experienced care-givers in the area. Whether Lou’s appointment is due to some perception by Will’s mother or simply desperation, we never really know but it does seem to work and gradually Will begins to tolerate and even like Lou.

Lou soon sees evidence that suggests that Will has tried to commit suicide in the past and we finally learn that he has made an agreement with his mother to wait only another 6 months before going to an assisted suicide facility in Europe. Unexpectedly, given her previous life, Lou meets this challenge head on and begins filling Will’s life with excursions and stimulation. Some of her plans are spectacularly disastrous, but simply living through them draws the pair together and their relationship deepens. As one would expect, love blossom and Lou finally gets rid of her dull, triathlon-obsessed boyfriend and devotes all her energy to planning the perfect holiday as a last effort to change Will’s mind about dying.

And this is where the story becomes massively controversial. Despite all her best efforts, Lou fails to make his life worth living and Will tells her that he still plans to commit suicide. She is devastated by his announcement that she is not a good enough reason for him to continue to live a life of endless suffering and dependency. However, she finally realizes that she needs to be there with him as he dies and makes peace with his decision to place his needs before hers.

Some people, such as Lou’s mother, will not accept Will’’s decision nor will they forgive those who allow him to fulfill the wish to die. Others understand that it is his decision to make and that nobody has the right to insist that he continues to live in increasing pain until an infection finally carries him off. The book makes it very clear that keeping Will alive is a constant battle against infection and that his health is so fragile that he could die at almost any time.

Naturally, the group discussed this issue for a very long time and whilst we could understand that the natural tendency of some people is to protect life at all costs, we unanimously agreed that it was Will’s decision, and his alone.

This was a man who had lived a vital, physical life before his accident; a man who could no longer do much more than sit in a chair and watch the world go by. Some people can adjust to that way of life, but others cannot. We appreciated that Lou sought out message boards for paraplegics and their care-givers, so that we saw that not all of them succumbed to the initial shock and grief. Many of them were living relatively happy lives, but understood Will’s frustrations. We were also happy that there was no miraculous recovery or wonder medicine that arrived to save the day, although Will could certainly afford any treatment that money could buy. In fact, we liked Ms Moyes decision to make Will wealthy enough that financial considerations were not a problem for him or his family. Even in Britain, where medical costs are mostly free at the point of delivery, he would not have easy access to some of the things that make his life more pleasant.

Some have criticized this book as a manifesto for killing disabled people. This is not how we viewed it. We saw it more as a very sad story about 2 people who met, fell in love and improved each other’s lives for a short time. However, that could not overcome the pain and suffering that one of them had to endure without possibility of respite.


Saturday, February 25, 2017

Books for March

Both our choices come from foreign shores this month. A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman was originally published in Swedish and has proven to be exceptionally popular. Fortunately, the Nooks allow us to bypass the giant hold list. Louise Penny is a Canadian author and a resident of our Popular Fiction room. We will be reading her debut novel, Still Life.

Both books are now on the Nooks.


A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn't walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove's mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents' association to their very foundations.


Still Life by Louise Penny

As the early morning mist clears on Thanksgiving Sunday, the homes of Three Pines come to life - all except one…

To locals, the village is a safe haven. So they are bewildered when a well-loved member of the community is found lying dead in the maple woods. Surely it was an accident - a hunter's arrow gone astray. Who could want Jane Neal dead?

In a long and distinguished career with the Sûreté du Quebec, Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has learned to look for snakes in Eden. Gamache knows something dark is lurking behind the white picket fences, and if he watches closely enough, Three Pines will begin to give up its secrets…




Monday, January 30, 2017

Books for February

I am pleased to report that our numbers have swelled recently – so much so that I may need to request a bigger room!

For February, we chose Cold Storage, Alaska by John Straley and Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain, both of which are now on the Nooks.



Cold Storage, Alaska by John Straley

Cold Storage, Alaska, is a remote fishing outpost where salmonberries sparkle in the morning frost and where you just might catch a King Salmon if you’re zen enough to wait for it. Settled in 1935 by Norse fishermen who liked to skinny dip in its natural hot springs, the town enjoyed prosperity at the height of the frozen fish boom. But now the cold storage plant is all but abandoned and the town is withering.

Clive “The Milkman” McCahon returns to his tiny Alaska hometown after a seven-year jail stint for dealing coke. He has a lot to make up to his younger brother, Miles, who has dutifully been taking care of their ailing mother. But Clive doesn’t realize the trouble he’s bringing home. His vengeful old business partner is hot on his heels, a stick-in-the-mud State Trooper is dying to bust Clive for narcotics, and, to complicate everything, Clive might be going insane—lately, he’s been hearing animals talking to him.


Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain  

After losing her parents, fifteen-year-old Ivy Hart is left to care for her grandmother, older sister and nephew as tenants on a small tobacco farm.  As she struggles with her grandmother’s aging, her sister’s mental illness and her own epilepsy, she realizes they might need more than she can give.

When Jane Forrester takes a position as Grace County’s newest social worker, she doesn’t realize just how much her help is needed.  She quickly becomes emotionally invested in her clients' lives, causing tension with her boss and her new husband.  But as Jane is drawn in by the Hart women, she begins to discover the secrets of the small farm—secrets much darker than she would have guessed.  Soon, she must decide whether to take drastic action to help them, or risk losing the battle against everything she believes is wrong.